To resize or not to resize
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: To resize or not to resize

  1. #1
    Rifleman jbsmwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122

    To resize or not to resize

    I have about 100 pieces of 308 win (HSM new/factory) and 100 pieces of .308 win LC (once fired and processed by some company). I have check the 4 pieces from each lot against a L.E. Wilson case gauge and the fits inside the tolerance. I put two pieces on my trimmer and both pieces got trimmed by a very small amount. So the overall length is longer then what I trim my brass too, but my question is should I resize the new and remanufactured brass.

  2. #2
    Rifleman jbsmwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122
    Decided to resize that way I know that the brass is consistent with the rest of my brass.

  3. #3
    G2
    G2 is offline
    Marksman G2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Right Behind You!
    Posts
    373
    I always resize and then trim....

  4. Remove Advertisements
    XCRForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Expert Mechanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lebanon, IN
    Posts
    1,193
    It all depends on how "standard" you want your ammo to be. I have Lapua, Hornady, and Starline 308 brass that I reload for the SRS. I do neck sizing only until I must push the shoulder back for proper head spacing in the SRS (if locking the bolt becomes difficult). Once I've fired the brass in the chamber, it's a perfect fit until it stretches enough to require the shoulder to be pushed.
    I also trim mine a bit shorter than spec. Being a bolt gun, seating depth and neck tension is something that I pay particular attention to. I am still trying to workup the "perfect" round for this particular rifle. Three different case brands, four different bullet weights, and four different powders. All with three to four different seating depths each. It's an overwhelming number of combinations, especially when one's testing time is limited.

    It really gives one an appreciation of how much work the pros put into producing their results!
    "Don't Tread On Me!"
    -- (reiterated without permission) Rich Hornay

  6. #5
    XCR Guru MickeyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    6,497
    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanic View Post
    It all depends on how "standard" you want your ammo to be. I have Lapua, Hornady, and Starline 308 brass that I reload for the SRS. I do neck sizing only until I must push the shoulder back for proper head spacing in the SRS (if locking the bolt becomes difficult). Once I've fired the brass in the chamber, it's a perfect fit until it stretches enough to require the shoulder to be pushed.
    I also trim mine a bit shorter than spec. Being a bolt gun, seating depth and neck tension is something that I pay particular attention to. I am still trying to workup the "perfect" round for this particular rifle. Three different case brands, four different bullet weights, and four different powders. All with three to four different seating depths each. It's an overwhelming number of combinations, especially when one's testing time is limited.

    It really gives one an appreciation of how much work the pros put into producing their results!
    For my accurate stuff, I follow the same routine. I’ll neck size a batch only and when it doesn’t chamber I’ll trim and resize the entire case, then revert to neck sizing until it goes in the junk pile.
    Semper in excremento sum, solum profunditas mutat. 'Always in the shit, only the depth varies'

    The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.... Margaret Thatcher,

    Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest.
    Mahatma Gandhi

  7. #6
    Expert Mechanic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lebanon, IN
    Posts
    1,193
    I use a Redding T7 with Redding Type S Competition Dies. I'm using Berger VLDs currently, but may try some of the Hybrids. I jam about one thou, and following the Berger's recommendations, a few jump depths.

    Due to my limited time, I've been trying to make/test too many batches at once. As soon as the weather improves, my new plan is to test only one combination of components per session (case, powder, bullet weight). I use only CCI BR2 and BR4 primers currently.

    I'm a bit hampered because my range is only 200 yards, and to really find the node I should be testing at three to three fifty.

    The new Vortex Golden Eagle should help! Being able to clearly see my impacts through the scope should make better use of my testing time.

    Maybe I'm nuts, but this shit is fun!
    "Don't Tread On Me!"
    -- (reiterated without permission) Rich Hornay

  8. #7
    Rifleman jbsmwd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122
    Wow, here I thought I was doing ok with my Hornady AP press and dies trying to get much as possible out my reloads that are shared across multiple rifles. I don't even know where to being with the neck tension stuff.

Sponsors

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •