.44 Magnum or .454 and Smith &Wesson vs Taurus
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Thread: .44 Magnum or .454 and Smith &Wesson vs Taurus

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    XCR Guru MickeyC's Avatar
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    .44 Magnum or .454 and Smith &Wesson vs Taurus

    Guys, I'd appreciate some insight here. I'm considering getting a revolver and am stuck between a Taurus .454 and the Smith & Wesson Model 69.

    thoughts, opinions?
    BADDFROGG likes this.
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    Marksman BADDFROGG's Avatar
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    That is a difficult one. Both are great revolvers. Is it for carry or home/range? The Taurus Tracker 44 is awesome. I also like the BFR revolver 45/70. The 454 might have too much kick for excellent accuracy.
    That is why I sold my Desert Eagle .50 AE. But if you are young and strong,plus a good pair gloves? Is there a big price difference in ammo and/or maximum size in the bullet grain? Check out www. ammo-seekcom for ammo prices, and bullet grain weights. Also Guns for Sale | Online Gun Store | Grab A Gun Online Gun Store for gun prices. Good luck on your purchase. Both are very powerful cartridges. I also regret selling my .44 Mag D.E.. But I have several AKs with folding stocks to make up for that and better for longer shots. .22 cents versus $2.00 or more per round.

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    Marksman hoppes-no9's Avatar
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    Actually, I think this is a very easy one: S&W in 44 mag, I'd suggest a used/pre-lock 629 over the 69 for the extra weight and capacity.

    If you need more gun, you need a rifle.
    Last edited by hoppes-no9; 11-08-2014 at 03:48 PM.

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    XCR Guru WatchoutforStobor's Avatar
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    Or a Glock 20 with 15 rounds.
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    Expert wombat338's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MickeyC View Post
    Guys, I'd appreciate some insight here. I'm considering getting a revolver and am stuck between a Taurus .454 and the Smith & Wesson Model 69.

    thoughts, opinions?
    My .02:

    Have had several S&Ws in .357 and .44 Mag -- I like the triggers and sights, but cannot stand the internal lock. I still have my Performance Center Model 627 -- SA, best trigger I have ever pulled.

    I have no personal experience with Taurus. Do they use MIM parts in their revolvers like they do in their pistols? If so, I would avoid on that basis alone.

    You may also want to look at a Ruger Redhawk (.44 Mag) or Super Redhawk (.454). I used to own a Super Redhawk Alaskan in 454 -- ugly gun, but it packed a wallop. Also, folks who know much more about wheelguns than I do write that the lockup on Rugers is much stronger than S&W N-frame.

    +1 on the Glock 20 -- for woods carry, 15 rounds of Buffalo Bore 10mm (with quick reloads available) would give me a greater sense of security than any revolver.
    “Americans have the right and advantage of being armed – unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.” -- James Madison

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    XCR Guru mjorin's Avatar
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    I've shot a 629 Classic for years and I love that revolver. I don't find the recoil punishing at all. The Taurus is a good pistol, but I don't think it is in the same category as the Smith. The Rugers are super tough, but not nearly as smooth. The .454 is a powerhouse, but expensive--I think you can shoot .45 Long Colt in them, too. I would agree with trying to find a pre-lock.
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    tk
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    Mickey,

    Personally I never recommend Taurus guns. QC is a problem, in my experience. Some are fine, but many are not.
    The Smith is a much better gun (although the .454 is an interesting caliber).

    tk
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    XCR Guru MickeyC's Avatar
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    Thanks so far. I Get the Glock 22 argument but for that I have a G22 with an extra half inch barrel and a mean 1550fps 135g load that rips. For this I'm really after the wheel gun as I don't have one currently.

    What is the lock issue with the Smiths?
    Semper in excremento sum, solum profunditas mutat. 'Always in the shit, only the depth varies'

    The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money.... Margaret Thatcher,

    Among the many misdeeds of the British rule in India, history will look upon the act depriving a whole nation of arms as the blackest.
    Mahatma Gandhi

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    XCR Guru mjorin's Avatar
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    Some people claim the recoil can make the lock accidentally slip on. There have been so many reports of this happening, that I believe it is true. You don't have to worry if there is no lock.

    http://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/sm...internal-lock/
    "Spes Mea in Deo Est"--My hope is in GOD
    The antidote for fifty enemies is one friend.--Aristotle

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    Expert wombat338's Avatar
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    Here's a pretty good discussion:

    http://john-ross.net/pdfs/mags.pdf

    Relative Strengths and Weaknesses
    .44 Magnum DA Revolvers
    The Smith & Wessons which started it all have unquestionably the best triggers and are aesthetically the best-looking .44 Magnum revolvers on the market. The vast majority of shooters consider them to balance and "point" far better than all other makes. The correctly-dimensioned chambers, throats, and barrels of S&Ws make them all very accurate. S&W also offers by far the greatest number of variations in this caliber (barrel lengths/weights, finishes, etc.) S&W customer service is second to none.
    However, the Models 29 and 629, despite ongoing engineering and metallurgical improvements, are based on a frame design that is nearly a century old and was originally built to handle a cartridge producing less than 15,000 PSI pressure. With the advent of widespread high-volume shooting made possible by low-cost progressive reloading equipment, and the common desire to push extra-heavy bullets at magnum velocities, the S&Ws do not hold up as well under this type of treatment as the Rugers, Dan Wessons, or Taurus guns. (The 26.5-ounce Ti/Scan 329, a tremendous engineering achievement, has no track record yet but is unlikely to be stronger in this regard than its dimensionally identical all-steel cousins.)
    Smith & Wesson has been here before, with the tremendously popular .357 Models 19 and 66. These guns did not stand up as well to high-volume magnum use as the company’s own heavier Model 27. In this case, S&W does not (yet) make a more-durable gun in .44 Magnum than the 629.
    Ruger’s Redhawk and Super Redhawk are capable of digesting large quantities of 320-grain magnum loads without ill effect. That’s the good news. The bad news is that from the factory they have poor quality triggers, and their design is such that even the most talented gunsmith can’t make them as good as an out-of-the-box S&W trigger. Further, Ruger’s interrelated dimensional tolerances for chambers, throats, and barrels are not nearly as precise as Smith & Wesson’s, and Redhawks tend to be oversize in at least two and usually all three of these areas, with resultant mediocre accuracy. The problem is so pervasive that Hamilton Bowen has built a business out of taking Redhawks in .357 or .41 Magnum caliber and reboring, rerifling, and rechambering them to .44 Magnum so as to get the proper (tighter) dimensions. This more than doubles the cost of the gun but some are willing to pay that to get a bull-strong .44 that is accurate and points almost as well as a S&W.
    Dan Wesson’s .44 was designed by a firm that knows a lot about making a gun that is strong and accurate but considerably less about making a gun that feels lively in the hand. They are a small piece of the .44 Magnum market and many of their customers are competitive silhouette shooters.
    Taurus makes a strong .44 that will take heavy loads and is usually quite accurate. Their rubber grips are very good at absorbing recoil. On the debit side, their triggers are mediocre, the guns are ugly, and if you dislike a muzzle-heavy feel you won’t like the way they balance. All of them are "ported," which means
    increased noise, lead blowback, and concussion. Quality control is spotty and customer service is sometimes nonexistent.
    Colt’s Anaconda is available again, from their custom shop. They have a fairly smooth action but are expensive and MUCH worse than a S&W at tolerating high-volume shooting. Their ideal customers are people who don’t fire their guns and think the Python has great looks.
    Hamilton Bowen, the custom pistolsmith mentioned above, takes a Redhawk in a smaller caliber and remachines it to a properly dimensioned .44 Magnum. He is doing what Ruger should be doing in the first place. Using his best efforts, his Redhawks feel almost as good as stock S&Ws, and are definitely more durable when using the heaviest loads.
    .445 SuperMag DA Revolvers
    The small Dan Wesson firm is the only DA revolver maker to chamber this long round. Thus, this little-known cartridge is only used by a fairly small group of silhouette shooters, handgun hunters, and experimenters who like to plink at long range.
    .45 Colt (Heavy Load Capable) DA Revolvers
    Ruger’s Redhawk possesses all the strengths and drawbacks of the .44 Magnum version of that gun.
    Bowen’s custom Redhawk starts life as a .44 Magnum and gets rebored, rerifled, and rechambered to .45 Colt with proper (tighter and more precise) dimensions. This costs $600 plus the cost of a .44 Redhawk.

    Smith & Wesson makes the N-framed 625 in .45 Colt but this gun IS NOT suitable for loads anywhere near as heavy as what a
    Ruger will accept because the N-frame’s smaller cylinder gets VERY thin at the bolt stop notches when bored to accept .45 Colt cases. Loads must be kept to levels similar to factory ammo designed for 19th century revolvers.
    .454 Casull DA Revolvers
    Taurus’ Raging Bull was the first DA .454. The gun is well made and accurate. Their rubber grips are very good at absorbing recoil. Like the .44, Taurus .454 triggers are mediocre, the guns are ugly, and if you dislike a muzzle-heavy feel you won’t like the way they balance. All of them are "ported", which means increased noise, lead blowback, and concussion with the high-pressure .454. Quality control on the .454 seems to be better than the .44 and customer service has generally been pretty good with the .454.
    Ruger’s ugly Super Redhawk is available in .454. It required the use of a special alloy steel (Carpenter 465) and heat-treat because Ruger insisted on making their .454 a 6-shot gun. Other previous Ruger comments apply here.
    Bowen’s custom 5-shot Redhawk costs $1400 plus your .44 Redhawk.
    CB3 likes this.
    “Americans have the right and advantage of being armed – unlike the citizens of other countries whose governments are afraid to trust the people with arms.” -- James Madison

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