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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
TLDR: Carried my rifle over my other shoulder and lost the take down/op rod

Ancillary lesson: If your gear ever makes a strange sound, stop everything, quit moving and inspect all of it. Fasteners, velcro, zippers, pouches, firearms etc ...stop and take stock.

I always carry my rifle slung over my right shoulder, so that it lays against my pack barrel facing the ground, I can throw slack in the sling and pull it up pretty quick from there......during a climb to the top of a small mountain (bout 5500 ft of elevation) somewhere around mile 10 my right arm went numb (this is damn near unavoidable, I've tried a few tricks to avoid this but mileage and weight are just what they are), stopped on a little stretch of flat, to swap shoulders.....ahhh, welcome relief.......well.....a few hundred yards after the swap I heard an unfamiliar metal sound, kind of readjusted my rifle and pack on the fly, everything felt right and was where it was supposed to be.....so I kept pushing.....

I had miscalculated the physical exertion of the climb, between the heat, the climbing and about 60lbs of gear I was already low on water, pretty good and smoked and had a mild case of summit fever so focus and awareness were definitely waning.....got to the top, made myself a little camp to enjoy the view and have a snack.....as I was staging all my gear for the break, realized my rifle was hanging open.......

Godammit.

As I was climbing something on the right side of my pack, where my rifle rarely sits, had triggered the take down lever and the sound I heard was the op rod falling out....Because of what most of us preach here (always have spares) I was able to get the rifle back up the moment I walked back in the door....but I was for damn sure alone in in jun country for the remainder of the day with nothing but a paperweight and a smile. Lesson learned.

The takeaway, there's nothing that replaces just sheer time and miles as far as knowing how your gear moves with you, what it feels like, what it sounds like, and any time you deviate from that known loadout, you gotta turn your brain on because you've just invited the chaos in. In the last few years, I've seen a sling (Magpul ms2) randomly just come undone (rifle fell smooth off my back, about 10 feet to a little landing below where I was), I've seen a branch wind up in a trigger guard and had I not felt something very strange in the resistance and pushed through (and had the safety not been on) that would have been an ND, I've seen debris get lodged in a holster that would have resulted in the discharge of a pistol had I tried to force it in, I've layed my rifle up against a rock in such a way that the safety was manipulated.....the chaos is out there. It doesn't seem avoidable either, you log enough hours with a pack, you pick up and put down a rifle enough times in different spots, the numbers say that at some point in the timeline, something comes undone, something fails, you put it down one way and pick it up another.

Anytime you put your rifle or pack down inspect and confirm. Before you don or sling, inspect your gear, confirm it is in the appropriate condition.....and actually, as I'm writing this, probably do this as your shucking your gear too.

Despite the hard lesson, the climb was amazing and 100% worth it....on the way down I stopped at a little pool where water was seeping out of the side of the mountain...realized I'd never put my life straw back in my pack from the last time I cleaned it......the pool was small and there was enough running into it that the flow was constant.....no animal tracks....gambled and won. Best water I've ever drank. Cool and delicious....life saving. The pool was under a small overhang, just laid there in the cool shade and cameled like a bastard, refilled my reservoir best I could (it was pretty shallow) and pushed out.

10/10 day.

Hope this finds everyone healthy, happy and chasing dreams.
 

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I love Salomon's trail running shoes (might be the most comfortable shoes I own)....I have a pair of their Qwest 4 GTX boots, but they aren't my favorites for boots. Good quality though....
 

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I've had this happen to me as well. The easy takedown of the XCR is a nice feature for a range gun, but IMO it causes problems in the field. The XCR needs a rear pin like the FNC, it can keep the takedown tab but that should not be what opens the gun, you should push the rear pin out, then push the takedown tab to free the oprod from the lower. In the meantime when I go out into the woods I wrap a bit of duct tape around the back of the rifle there to make sure it doesn't dump on me if I bump the tab.
 

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I've had this happen to me as well. The easy takedown of the XCR is a nice feature for a range gun, but IMO it causes problems in the field. The XCR needs a rear pin like the FNC, it can keep the takedown tab but that should not be what opens the gun, you should push the rear pin out, then push the takedown tab to free the oprod from the lower. In the meantime when I go out into the woods I wrap a bit of duct tape around the back of the rifle there to make sure it doesn't dump on me if I bump the tab.
Simplest fix would be to add a tiny length of pic rail to the top of the lower, then bridge it some how with a custom qd thing to the upper. Imagine extending the pic rail on the upper rearward, with a qd lever over the lower section (like an adm titanium qd lever/aim point mini mount, but it's just bridging the 2 pic rail sections).
 

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Simplest fix would be to add a tiny length of pic rail to the top of the lower, then bridge it some how with a custom qd thing to the upper. Imagine extending the pic rail on the upper rearward, with a qd lever over the lower section (like an adm titanium qd lever/aim point mini mount, but it's just bridging the 2 pic rail sections).
It would need to be super low profile to not obstruct your line of sight to the optics.

A spring loaded or captured stubby push pin/button in front of the take down tab to keep it from moving forward would be relatively easy to build in...provided there's enough meat in the receiver....but that would likely necessitate a new upper design...and at that point a better design rather than a band aid would probably be better.
 

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I don't know how many of you guys remember an old member here, Variable Binary.....he had the latch nub machined down flat. I'd imagine that would keep it from snagging quite so easily on things.....

Just another thought.
 

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Anything could happen, but I have to say I've never had a problem with the take down latch. Even in high round count rifle classes. Probably more likely in the field. Certainly something to think about.
 
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