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I briefly considered a muzzle brake for my XCR... but then I thought whats the point on a .223 so I went with the Smith Vortex flash hider instead.
 

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Texas,

I think there are a hell of alot of Comp/MB/Flash Hiders out there, and I'm sure they are all good in one way or another.

In my experience the Smith Ind Vortex G6 is a good one:



If you go to Smith Ent. Web Site they even have a vidoe demo of a vortex on a .50cal.

http://www.smithenterprise.com/products06.html

These are pretty hard to find at the moment, and the MSRP is $53.99. If you want a quote, drop me an e-mail, I have a source ;)
 

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Like the A2 a lot, but will most likely spring for a phantom2 for the 6.8 when I get it. There are a lot of good choices but the phantom LOOKS good, performs good, and CAN dice someone up good if it ever comes to close work. Slice, dice, and shoot with the same implement!

I have a VORTEX on my M96 on the Recon barrel, and it works well. I just remember the original AR-15 "open" flash hider and did NOT like it "over there."

I don't plan on leading any bayonnet charges (at my age) but the "in-you-face" use of the phantom has potential.
 

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Is there a noticeable difference than the flash hider, recoil wise?
Since it's a compensator and not a muzzle brake, I believe it's goal is to keep the the muzzle down during firing-I can tell a bit of difference between it and the a2. I'd be hard pressed to notice recoil reduction in a .223 before I got to the full on muzzle brakes like the benny ****** or jp brake...
 

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a compensator is meant to push the gases up on firing to keep the muzzle down, a muzzle brake pushes the gases in a manner as to reduce recoil.

muzzle brakes:




compensator:


 

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Wouldnt that DTNC in the bottom photo be considered a muzzle brake as it redirects the gasses to the sides as opposed out the top?
 

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that design actually does move gas up, but some comps do push gases mostly sideways to 'neutralize' the muzzle rise...it seems a true brake pushes some gas rearward.
 

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I have a muzzle brake on my 300 Weatherby that tames recoil down to about what a .223 recoils. The holes in the brake appear perpendicular to the bore as far as the eye can see. A compensator takes energy from the exhaust gas and uses it to push the barrel down (elementary physics, Newton's laws and all that). The holes in the Weatherby brake are all around the circumference so there's no net "push" in any direction but it does remove enough energy to significantly reduce the recoil. The bullet has already reached maximum velocity and almost exited the barrel when the gases hit the holes in the brake so the reduction of energy is totally from the gases that are diverted from the straight ahead direction - recoil is in the opposite direction from the bullet path - and the reduced energy equals reduced recoil.
 
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