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Wow. Not bad at all. She seemed to have a few failure to fire/jams but handled them nicely.
 

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Very nice. Get over the limp wristing and she'll do very nicely. focus on the target, no hesitation on drills. Very nice.
 

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who is that your daughter? she has more skills than me!
 

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who is that your daughter? she has more skills than me!
Nope. No kids here.....that I know of (oldest joke in the book. I know. ::)) If my first kid is a girl though I'd be damn proud if she was that comfortable at the range.

The description says she's 11 and was doing drills with Tactical Resonse. Here are a few more clips.
http://shock.military.com/Shock/videos.do?displayContent=171379&page=3

http://shock.military.com/Shock/videos.do?displayContent=171378&page=4
 

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I'm in love.

What a sweetheart!

Reminds me of one of my daughters.

Good vids.
 

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Two things to note:

First off, the malfunction drills could be done with a bit more flip to the right. If you've got real problems, just the action of flipping the pistol to the right as the slide is brought back smartly helps.

E.G. an empty can bounce off a baracade and flip back into the ejection port. Drawing the slide back won't clear that kind of malf - but flipping the empty out of the ejection port area sure does. There are times this won't help at all, but sometimes it will. I had a 45ACP casing bank off of a baracade and then fly back into the ejection port backwards - then chamber. So the rim was completely in the chamber (something that can happen with straight bodied casings much more than tapered body casings like the 9mm) and there isn't anything short of pounding it out with a cleaning rod that will make the pistol functional again.

Second off, we never move backwards. ALWAYS move forwards. Not necessarily forwards towards the threat, but we move forwards. If you're too close, or trying to create distance, moving forward - the forward direction being 90 degrees or so to the line you're using to shoot at the threat. When you move backwards, its easy to trip over things. Even simple things. The human body is much more stable forward than backward - that's why our feet stick out in front rather than behind our ankles ;D

There are times when you HAVE to move backwards, because it's the only choice. In that circumstance, movement is done VERY slowly, using your left foot (assuming right-handedness) like an antenna behind you. Once your left foot 'sweeps' a clear path (finding all the curbs, rocks, etc so you DO NOT fall over 'em) then you place that left foot securely and move you right foot back to it. Then repeat the process ad nauseum.

On the good side, she was being taught to ALWAYS move when firing. That's major-league important. As well, the 'don't stop, don't stop' when clearing malfs. It's surprising how many adults - well trained adults - stop to look in disbelief at their pistol just because it won't go bang. As well, you noted that she was continually keeping her eyes on the threat. BEAUTIFUL.

Terra, if your little sister is like you, have her look me up in another 10 years :eek:
 
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