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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a simple little trick that those of us in the IT industry do to boost our Internet response times. :eek:

Use the following link to setup your router or computer to use the following DNS IP Addresses. If you don't trust me on these IPs, please just Google them and you'll see they are legit.

4.2.2.1
4.2.2.2

https://www.opendns.com/homenetwork/start

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

You can if you like use these addresses as well:

4.2.2.3
4.2.2.4
4.2.2.5
4.2.2.6

Or

156.154.70.1
156.154.71.1
 

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There has to be a catch to this? Why would they do this for free?
 

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Merlin,

Those are the "root" DNS servers. Without getting to much into the details instead of your computer asking around... it goes directly to the source to get its answers.

I personally don't do this because I think that the gain may be negligable, but I can definately understand the thought behind it.

Simply put without those servers doing what they do, we wouldn't go to anything by name (www.xcrforum.com) we would have to be typing 209.124.50.236 instead. Make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This will only increase the response time. Not your internet speed. Don't confuse the two.

think of it this way.

You need to get directions to a really hot chicks house. Instead of asking your friend, who in turn has to ask his friend, who then asks his friend, who then asks the hot chick, you are asking the hot chick yourself. This means you get to the site quicker.

In any case you can try it out. If you don't see any difference then you can alsway set your DNS to the old ones. No harm no foul. ISP DNS servers are notorious for being slow and out dated. The root DNS servers are known to be fast and current.

;D
 

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Actually the lookup doesn't happen all the way up the tree. If this were true than those root servers would have probably melted from the HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS of people pounding to get to google.com and the like. Instead the DNS is cached on your ISPs server. So by selecting the root server you actually INCREASE the delay because every time you request something your packets have to go all around the internet (past the DNS node located at your ISP) jumping from router to router trying to reach the root server. When you use the DNS server provided by your ISP you will significantly increase the speed with which lookups happen (unless the DNS server is underpowered or overwhelmed, but that's a separate issue).

The only way to truely increase DNS lookups is to do them locally on your computer via the localhosts file. Back in the day people used to do this for some basic sites that they visit on a regular basis (search engine, email, news, etc). Actually, I still have google.com in my localhosts file.

Otherwise I would strongly advise against going with any DNS server that's not located at your ISP (unless that server is just plain ol' not working).
 

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Go with Lex on this one. Unless your ISP has a particularly inefficient or over utilized DNS they will be faster.
 

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OOO OO I teach classes on this stuff! Host files can also be handy if places where you work blackhole stuff.....

not that anyone would do that type of thing... buttt... yeah.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Lex is partialy correct (sorry Lex but I design million dollar computer systems and networks for major corporations and for the government). He is correct that you would benefit by running your very own DNS server which would forward you to an authorative server for that particular domain. However, I didn't bother to point that out in my original post as most people do not have the know how (I know it's not difficult) or they do not have the spare hardware or software to do it correctly.

With that said, please read below to fully understand how DNS works.

The Domain Name System is maintained by a distributed database system, which uses the client-server model. The nodes of this database are the name servers. Each domain (google.com) or subdomain (maps.google.com) has one or more authoritative DNS servers that publish information about that particular domain and the name servers of any domains subordinate to it. The top of the hierarchy is served by the root nameservers: the servers to query when looking up (resolving) a top-level domain name (TLD) such as .com, .net, .org, etc.

Some of the root DNS severs are 4.2.2.1 thru 4.2.2.6 (see orig post)

Ther is no one single DNS server within an ISP that can contain all the records for the Internet. It would be too costly considering the size of the Internet and the cost BigIP and 3DNS loadbalancing. So what happens is you point your browser to apple.com and if your ISP's DNS does not have an authorative answer to the address (usualy the case), the ISP's DNS server then routes root DNS server , which then send you to a DNS server with the authorative entry. Once and only once you get to the authorative DNS server, will you be directed to google.com. Very few Cable or DSL ISPs are authorative in this sense.

Companies like Level3 Communications are the backbones to the Internet. They maintain some of these root servers and use huge loadbalancing systems such as 3DNS and BigIP. And to support this load you are talking about multiple OC192 pipes (9.6 gigabits per second per pipe) of bandwidth. A single OC192 circuit is 5,000 times faster than a T-1 line. So how does Level3 Communications make their money to support the Internet backbones, you ask? Because ISP pay a fee to tap those lines and get access. At a pretty penny I might add. I recently worked on a project for Bank of America where they wanted to have an OC48 connection directly into AT&T's backbone. And let me tell ya, it won't cheap.

*Note*
AT&T is begining to roll out OC768. Now that is jet screamin' fast. But you would be looking at nearly 7 figures a month to have that kind of a connection as opposed to a few 100K per month for OC192.

Now I never said that the site you visit will actually load the page in your browser any faster, however, you will get to the site a little bit faster.



BOTTOM LINE: I am just trying to help you guys out. You don't have to do it if you don't want to. You can try it and if you don't see a difference then either do nothing or change it back.

It's no big deal really.
 

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Ah come on lets not get in a pissing contest. I dont believe the potential speed gain would be worth the hardware or headache for most of the end users here. Without getting into a conversation that would go over peoples heads that are level 70 nerds on WoW and stuff I think we should just leave it as a kind suggestion and leave it at that :)

You aren't the only one that designs networks just FYI :)
 

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Actually....no.

Root servers, managed by the twelve organizations that run them store the addresses of the TLD Authoritative servers. These servers hold all the data on the top level domains. There is also, more than one DNS server for each top level domain.

In the Windows world the way DNS works is as follows; You type in a URL. Your machine looks in the DNS resolver cache local to your machine, if the entry is not there it goes in order to your DNS servers. When it gets a response form the first, that server checks it's database. If the corresponding IP address is found it passes it back to your machine and your machine contacts the IP address. If it is not there it performs a lookup to it's DNS server and so on until it finds a match or it hits a TLD DNS server which tells it no match exists.

Soooo, to avoid all this lookup traffic, most ISPs host their own DNS server, which acts as a cache as each lookup that hits it and returns with a result is stored for a predetermined time. ISPs do this to avoid unnecessary traffic and congestion on their pipes.

As an end user you can manage you DNS resolver cache much in the way an ISP manages theirs. Extend the life of valid entries and remove the negative entries and for your regularly visited sites you won't ever go to a DNS server, you will resolve the IP address locally. If you want toget really anal you can play with the DNs packet count to reduce the number of packets sent in a query but this can cause incompatability for DNs servers and is not advised.

No, I don't design global networks per se...one of the teams that works for me does......A company we work with owns a 7.2 Terrabit pipe across the Atlantic, owns another 7.2 Tb pips across the pacific and various other fiber connections in ther 250,000Km network. They count Google as well as AT&T, Orange and a few other backbone companies as their customers. By own, I mean they own the fiber cables running undersea. They also carry more data and voice traffic than anyone else.
 

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Wonder if this would have helped me overseas where we were paying $85 a month for what amounted to dail-up.
 
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