XCR Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a Millett Zoom Dot and an ADM aimpoint mount to put it in. This is my first time putting an optic in a mount myself and I was wondering if there was a way to make sure it is perfectly level or if the SWAG and eyeball method is good enough. Looks pretty good to me but I wanted to make sure I got it right before I zero it.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,533 Posts
There are these paddle-like things that you can buy, I never have.

What I do, is make sure my rifle is setting completely vertical. Using a line on the wall, you can make sure the cross-hairs are straight up and down.

To verify, get on the range CLOSE. Like 25 to 50 meters. Run the scope as low as it'll get, fire 10 rounds (which should be in danged-near one hole) then run the scope up as high as it'll go - repeat the grouping.

If the groups aren't vertical, either it's your hold, or the scope needs twisting.

With boltguns it's easier. With the bolt removed, you can look down the barrel at the line on the wall, making sure it's centered in the barrel. Everything HAS to be good then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Zoom dots don't have cross hairs if I'm looking at the right thing here. It's a dot. The only problem you'll have if it's canted is that it'll drift right or left slightly when dialing the elevation in when you zero it. (Or up and down with windage...) There's no BDC or turrets or anything like that, so I can't think of a reason that it would need to be perfectly straight.

If you must have it straight there are a few ways that I can think of. If you have a small level and a vise, you can level the rifle and then level the flat on the top of the scope. If there is a flat surface on the top of the mount and another above it on the bottom of the scope you can use a small ruler or gage block or other reasonably square piece of metal or hard plastic to make them parallel. You do that by sliding the ruler inbetween the scope and mount and twisting it up until it makes contact with the scope while keeping the other edge flat on the mount. When both edges are in flat contact one with the mount the other with the scope, then those surfaces will be parallel. Now none of this means the elevation and windage adjustments will actually be square to the body...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,533 Posts
DOH!
I didn't catch the dot part......

The group thing still works well - if you care. My Aimpoint has a bit of "off level" in it, although I got it as flat as I could with a level. The only way I can tell is that my 300 yard zero requires one click left more than my 25 / 50 meter zero (and the elevation difference of course).

If the adjustments were square, I wouldn't need that one click. The thing is, with a dot scope, typically we don't change adjustments after it's zeroed. I could twist the optic in the rings, but it just doesn't matter that much to me.

Like Oliver mentioned - get it as right as you can, zero, and have fun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses guys.

I figured close enough is good enough, especially considering even if you have it mounted so the windage and elevation adjustments are perfectly square with the rifle, it is highly doubtful that your rifle will be square with your target once you get into firing position, unless your using a bench or bipod. I just wanted to make sure it was as close as possible the first time so it doesn't nag me latter, causing me to do something stupid like readjusting it and throwing off my zero (I can get a little anal about things sometimes).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,623 Posts
Thanks for the responses guys.

I figured close enough is good enough, especially considering even if you have it mounted so the windage and elevation adjustments are perfectly square with the rifle, it is highly doubtful that your rifle will be square with your target once you get into firing position, unless your using a bench or bipod. I just wanted to make sure it was as close as possible the first time so it doesn't nag me latter, causing me to do something stupid like readjusting it and throwing off my zero (I can get a little anal about things sometimes).
You should try to get it as close as possible,There is a device for this that makes it easy.It's called the Wheeler level-level-level.
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=529349
It's meant mostly for bolt action rifles but can be adapted to dang near any rifle.Don't trust your eye,it will lie to you.The whole purpose of squared mounting is that no cant exists.This won't mean much at close range,but at longer distances if the crosshair is leaning the bullet will drift in that direction,because it means you zeroed the rifle with the bullet not being exactly parallel to the center of the bore,the father the range past the zero range the farther the drift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I tried Oliver's ruler trick and it sat flush with the bottom of the optic and the base of the mount. Also on the Zoom Dot were the controls mount to the side of the tube there is a nice vertical seam, and the ADM mount has an octagonal shape on the outside, and the seam on the optic and the flat side of the mount line up perfectly. I'm going to call it good for now, and when I get the chance later I will use a leveling device to make sure.

Well I'm off to the gun club to zero this thing, and they do have a gunsmith on staff so maybe he can check it for me. ;)
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top