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Does anyone have any suggestions for Reloading Drills ?

I need some good drills to do at home.

It would help if you had links to videos of the drill.
 

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Hi Tac,

I know this is an old post, but...
While I don't have any video links I guess I will give you my opinions / ideas. I hope they help you.

First, I don't know what type of rig you use (military, police, mags in a pocket etc.) or what type of gear you have (Tac vest, LBE w/ mag pouches) So let me just say that because it looks cool does not mean it will work.

I drill with a military rig. 12 mags (4 pouches 3 mags each) on a Blackhawk LBE harness. (Other various pouches as well.)

I use snap caps, one in each mag. During simulated firing I cycle the bolt to one, practice clearing a malfunction and two, to build motor skills so finding the charging handle is automatic in that you don't have to fumble to find it while keeping the weapon pointed down range. Excellent feature of the XCR as opposed to the AR platform. This of course locks the bolt open to simulate an empty mag. Continue to "fire" as if you cleared a malfuction before reloading. I use a dump pouch for my empties. In a combat situation it is not wise to drop mags. You may not be able to pick them up and resupply may not be an option. When changing mags, practice keeping the weapon shouldered and pointing down range. Nothing says your empty more then your rifle pointing up and tilted to find the mag well. If you are behind cover, pointing the weapon up may alert your enemy to your position and he can wait for you to "pop up" You can pretty much figure out what happens next.

Wherever you do your drills, backyard, basement, whatever, set up obstacles so you can practice from standing, kneeling and prone positions. Move from position to position and spend some time in each position as if you were firing 30 rounds or more. (yes, you can say bang, bang if you want. lol) Believe me, you will find out quickly if your rig works. Continue moving from position to position. Don't always follow the same pattern. In my case, when I am out of ammo (I have gone through all 12 mags) I transition to my sidearm for a tactical retreat. ( You can do this during any phase of the drill to simulate an unclearable malfunction. Yes, they will happen)

Time yourself from the first time you try it. It is not easy. If anyone is watching you while you do it they will think you're nuts. Train as you'll fight, so you will fight as you've trained. To coin a phrase from a very knowledgable person on this subject. practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect. Don't cut any corners to make it easier. Drill as if you were really in a combat situation. Have some friends scream at you or toss things (pebbles, not bricks lol) at and around you while you do it. Anything that raises the stress level makes it more difficult. If outdoors drill in the rain, snow, hot and cold. Conditions and clothing worn make a big difference.

Hope this helps or at least gives you some of your own ideas. In any event it is a hell of a workout. Think you are in good shape? Give it a try.

Roy.
 

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Maybe it's training, but we were trained to never stay in position long enough to fire more than a handful of rounds. Staying in place too long makes you a center of attention for many opposing shooters. Keep moving and learn to reload on the move. Move forward all the time, keeping up pressure. Staying still too long invites gunfire or somethng bigger.
 

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MickeyC

Agreed. A moving target is always harder to hit. The reason for remaining awhile in one place/position is so the trainee can become familiar with that position while manipulating the weapon from it. The next evolution in the drill would be reloading on the move. For most, if they can not reload quickly while standing still wearing heavy/bulky equipment they will not be able to reload on the move with any fluidity.
Crawl before you can walk, walk before you can run. It is all about building motor skills and redundancy so manipulating the weapon/equipment becomes second nature.

Roy
 

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It's not so much about being a moving target as not becoming a static one.

I agree with the crawl, walk, run mentality however.

In the standing position, load a magazine, shout fire, and reload, shout fire and reload etc..until you are out of magazines.

When you can do it without looking at the magazines, weapon or fumbling and your times become steady, try it kneeling and then lying prone. Then start doing it while walking, jogging and running, as you would in a real situation.

Practise it over and over until reloading becomes second nature.
 

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Exactly, you need to practise changing mags until you no longer have to think about the mag change. You stay focussed on what is going on and change mags instinctlvely.
 

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As they always used to say, "Slow is smooth, smooth is fast". All these videos you see on youtube of guys doing these super fast "tactical" mag changes and position switches, it is pissing into the wind. Trying to do something that fast is just asking for a dropped mag. Do it slow and do it smooth, let the speed come naturally with time.

I run a very basic setup, 2 mag pouches on my left side, with the full mags upside down and facing outward. When I reload, I reach down and pull one out, grab the spent mag with the same hand, with the loaded mag horizontal, hit the release, pull out the spent, rotate my hand and insert the fresh. Then I put the spent one back into the mag pouch facing right side up. Or if I am in a bind for time I throw the spent mag into my top. Nothing fancy, nice and simple, fancy gets you killed, simple keeps the red stuff inside.
 

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Mickey C, i yell "bang", or "bang bang" for the DT.

before my friend and i shoot we have a drill to wear ourselves out first.

we put up 5 target stands, w/ 2 targets per stand, and spread them out pretty good. Targets are #'d 1-5 w/ A & B target per stand. so if your a bird looking at our range, and imagine that roughly its 60-70 yards between 1 and 5, and then you have designated shooting boxes, #'d appropriately

so row 1 is targets, and the numbers below are the designated boxes, keep in mind this is next to a creek and a draw, so there is uphill/downhill elevation changes, trees in the way, and cover to use, negotiate. The route from one box to the next is up to the shooter, so its up to the director to keep the shooter challenged by coming up with difficult transitions between boxes.



1 2 3 4 5
AB AB AB AB AB




2



1


4 5

3




OK, if this has worked you should now have a basic idea, and the drill is, you have to shoot from the box # which corresponds to the target # unless otherwised directed.

now, you get out the stop watch, and hit go, for 5 minutes at a time its a 100 mph drill (w/ empty mags)

I.e.

GO!!!!!!!

"GIMME 2 on 4a"

--run as fast as you can, with the barrell ALWAYS GLUED TO THE DIRT directly off your reaction side, safety on, and finger not on the trigger. get to box 4, square up, manipulate safety, focus on sight picture, yell "BANG BANG" while gently touching the trigger twice. About the time you're indexing the safety again, the director/range master should be yelling something like

"GIMME 2 on 1b prone"

so with your safety back on, barrell again glued to the ground on your reaction side, you run like people are dying to box 1, go prone CORRECTLY, manipulate the safety on the way down, get your sight picture, yell "bang" and recover while getting on that safety again.

there should never be a lull, and for mechanics, you gotta have someone watching you who is committed to making you better, they have to catch it when you're not square, when your grip and body position are unacceptable, when you fail to index the safety properly in between shots, if you're finger is on the trigger any time other than when you're yelling "bang" etc. You will only develop habits as good as the person instructing/watching you.

you can then get creative giving directions in groups "GIMME 3 on 4b from 1 prone, 2 on 4A kneeling" and believe me, 1:30 in, strings of instructions get fuzzy in the midst of everything else you're thinking about.

My friend was the first one to yell "DOUBLE FEED" in the midst of a run, and we immediately began throwing in malfunctions after that. Just practicing this drill lead to a very noticable drop in the time it took to react to an actual malfunction during live fire*****(if you want to practice double feeds during live practice, get some sig-sauer factory magazines, the polymer one's with the couplers...they work great for getting consistent malfunctions)


to make it easy, switch off with you're partner, you run one, and then let him/her run one, so you get 5 minute or so recoveries. Really wanna see what kind of habits you have when the chips are down? run 10 of these drills with 1 minute recoveries in between. 60 yards can turn into a mile, and if your the kind of individual that can really dig, you may wind up goin prone while dodgin some hurl. But hey, these drills are only as real as you make em. Imagine what ever you gotta, but find that hustle. You'll get out of this drill exactly what you put into it. If you just saunter around, its not tough. But start going for it, and it gets intense.

You'll also notice that if you practice like this, and throw in some pushups and pull ups in between, you'll get used to manipulating everything tired, winded, and with your muscles drained, and then shootin normally gets reeeeal easy. You startin throwin down on these drills where you can put together 5 crisp minutes, sharp transitions, always on that safety, and fast clear sight pictures, and a couple'a 90 rounds of live fire is cake. (but then take a minute to remember those boys in mogadishu that fought a 48 hour running battle outta that city.....)

After just 3 sessions w/ these dry fire drills, my live fire accuracy and speed had dramatically increased, right now were working on shooting on the move, and "check/clear" drills.

** a side note, we immediately noticed when we began experimenting with different drills, that the moment you get tired, or winded, you will revert back to the last level of competency you mastered, you're grip and stance are the first things to go, which are arguably the most critical. So if you practice like this, i gotta re-iterate, do it with someone that will check you hard, you'll only be as good as what they find acceptable.
 

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MickeyC

We're definitely on the same page.

I gave Tac a simple drill he can do at home as he asked. Not everyone will have the space needed for situational combat drills.

In my case doing any drills outside would most likely result in a visit from the local P.D. However, when I go "elsewhere" we set up similiar to TexasChris except we only use three targets.

As far as moving, or as I am sure you know, Manuevering, to not remain static was the point I was trying to make. Again we are on the same page.

Crawl, Walk, Run...

Crawl: Master manipulating your weapon and equipment.

Walk: Add individual/unit tactics. Create a unit SOP

Run: Put it all together in dry/live fire excercises.

Roy
 

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Does anyone have any suggestions for Reloading Drills ?

I need some good drills to do at home.

It would help if you had links to videos of the drill.
Master reloading before trying to reload on the move. I've been to quite a few classes and have seen people fall because they were trying to do two things, but had no proficiency in either.

Instead, to start, stand squared away with your gun shouldered in the firing positing with an empty mag in place.

Press mag release and drop the empty mag. Some people pull it out just in case it isn't drop free. Retain, or don't retain, it's your choice, but I say don't retain.

Tilt the gun up till the handguard and barrel are eye level. Rest the stock into your elbow joint and rotate the magwell toward your heart.

From this position the empty magwell will be the height of your jaw with the gun sloping outward like a ramp, and you can also keep an eye on what your threat is doing. You rest the stock into your elbow joint to stabilize the weapon.

Because the magwell is high and easily visible it makes putting in a new mag very easy. Insert new mag, slap new mag on the base, and then grab the mag body and tug it to ensure it is fully seated. You don't want to be a position where your mag hits the deck and you need to reach for it.

After the mag is in and properly seated hook the bolt release with your thumb to release it, or use your index finger. (Only applies to XCR shooters)

Bring your gun back into the fight.

Do that a few times every day until it all flows in one smooth motion. Being consistent is more important than being fast. After you get that motion down, start doing it from behind cover.
 

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to tack on a tidbit (since this was about reloading *shakes head* not shooting drills) with what VB is saying, rememeber to stay in firing position, give the rifle a good crank 90 degrees counter clockwise (for right handers) this will aid in extraction, but will not aid in retention, unless you're quick with your left hand.
 

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Master reloading before trying to reload on the move. I've been to quite a few classes and have seen people fall because they were trying to do two things, but had no proficiency in either.
No proficiency moving? I've been moving my entire life.

Why learn something twice? If you are going to change mags on the move, practice changing mags on the move. After doing that, changing mags standing still will be easy.
 

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you'd think that.....but its not really so.

moving with a weapon is a whole different ball game.

moving with a weapon while maintaining precision shot placement, proper weapon control, and peripheral awareness is a different sport.

moving like it matters(like your ass is on fire)while demonstrating correct mechanics and good shot placement is an art form.

JMO.
 

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Master reloading before trying to reload on the move. I've been to quite a few classes and have seen people fall because they were trying to do two things, but had no proficiency in either.
No proficiency moving? I've been moving my entire life.

Why learn something twice? If you are going to change mags on the move, practice changing mags on the move. After doing that, changing mags standing still will be easy.
I believe he's saying master one aspect at a time, then build on that. Trying to do too many new things at once usually just leads to a person doing them all wrong. If you're comfortable with mag changes standing still, great, go ahead and start adding other elements.



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I'm gonna have to agree with VB on his reloading technique. I've seen it done with the weapon still pointed down range, but I'm gonna fall back on how we were trained.

Ideally you're gonna move to whatever cover is available, or pending the situation, you can take a knee. If you have to reload while moving forward, I like reloading one way consistently. (This includes the same "workspace" I bring my pistol to when reloading that as well.)

****, I know you've been moving all your life, but how often or how many times a day do you move with a rifle or having to reload your rifle. Get your technique down and as Mickey stated above, crawl walk run. That's just my opinion of course.

Chris, just to give you an advantage for when you get your contract, whenever you move from station to station safe, high port and run. You'll have a leg up when you get there.
 

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Tac, find what is comfortable for you. All of us have our own ideas. Some have been trained, some worked their methods out individually. Some are good some ara not, some work when you are in a group, some when on your own.

Start slow and work up the speed, it will come in it's own time. You'll do a few thousand changes before it becomes instinctive. During that time you'll change things a bit and get something you sare comfortable with.
 

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I don't think it's a crawl, walk, run thing.

How often do you walk or run and do something else?

Sure it's a rifle, but it's not rocket science.

I'm all about practice, but if you're at home practicing reloading, why not move and reload? Less to learn later.
 
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