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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I would share some action pics of me and my XCR from rifle school, a couple of weeks ago.















I knew we shot a lot off hand, but I was suprised that more of the pics were of me shooting left handed when I am a righty.
 
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looks awesome!!

thant last pic with the dragging, the man dragging should be in front of the man covering. my thought is that if one were on gravel or were to slip on a pice of brass it would be all too easy to poke a hole in the man in front.

was there another thought behind that?


do you get to carry your rifle on duty?
 

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Thanks for the pics. 8) Looks like you had an entertaining day of it. ;D :2cents:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You're not wrong...Best I can say it was a matter of real world creeping in and I moved too slow or my partner moved too fast or a combo of both. I wish there was a better answer. We were about 6 to 8 feet apart engaging seperate targets so that kept our muzzles farther from each other, but still definitely not ideal.

My XCR is my duty gun and I am quite pleased with it as such.

It was actually a five day class, but most of the pics are from days 3 and 4 as we built up to the drills pictured.

It was a great class in that I got to test every piece of gear I use on the road, SWAT, and sniping (at least as far as my XCR was concerned). I also got to run with and without VFG and a little time on an AR as well. I tried to run everything for at least one range block, usually two to three hours. It let me make back to back comparisons, at least as much as I could. I was trying to get insight into the different mehods/techniques out there so I could be a better instructor for my guys when I got back.

All in all, for the drills they exposed us to, it is hard to beat a quality carbine with a RDS of some sort. Backup sights are a must, as I had some dot wash out for a couple of hours, one afternoon. I found that I really like a direct co witness as I could center my front sight in the tube of the RDS and get easy hits out to 25 yards, as quick as with the RDS, or at least darn close.

A simple go bag is pretty versatile, but keep it light. The strap of the go bag and the sling competed with each other and were a little uncomfortable but I couldn't find a way around that.

All in all I ran VFG/No VFG. Red dot, Red dot with magnifier, IOR 2-12 with Burris fast fire, and with/without cheek riser.
 

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I have to ask, or assume that the Dept is providing all the ammo? I don't think it gets much better than someone else providing ammo and you get to experiment with different setups.
 

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Great pics!

In your comparison, did you prefer with VFG or without?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
From a scrictly shooting perspective, I like no VFG better. As a LEO, we do a lot more clearing/searching than we do shooting. Factor in varying thicknesses of body armor and clothing and the bulkier I get, the more I like the VFG.

I don't like lights with pressure/tape switches so light manipulation comes into the equation as well. With no VFG and the light mounted on the left side, above the rail, it was very very awkward to activate the light when shooting from the left shoulder. With the VFG and the light mounted on the right side, below the rail, the light could be easily activated from the left shoulder.

The two night fires made me reconsider the CAA FGA for a couple of reasons. First, it made the rifle more ambidextrous. Using the FGA, the light manipulation is the same for either shoulder. Second, light placement, especially with a 250 lumen light, became more critical. The barricades we were using were unpainted plywood. With the light in a Larue offset mount on the right side, I had to get further away from cover on the left side to make sure I didn't blind myself with my own light. Even with the dull, non reflective surface, it was suprising how easy it was to get a lot of light back in your face. With the FGA, the light is directly beneath the bore, so using cover is the same for the L or R side of the barricade. Even with the potential of a lot of splash back of light, I wouldn't go back to a lower intensity light. The ability to see more, at a greater distance is very important to me and worth the slight downside.

In the end, I would say it comes down to what best fits your needs based upon anticapted use and personal preference. If I didn't think I would use a lot of off hand shooting, I would probably run no VFG with the light on the left side above the rail. For the environment I work in, half the corners are left handed, so the more ambidextrous the rifle/light, the better, hence the reason the VFG is back on the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
As for ammo, mine was PD provided. One of the guys in class is a tactical paramedic and paid his own tuition and ammo so he could improve his skills. I was impressed with his dedication as he is not a gun toter, but wanted to learn more about tactics and shooting so he could better support the guys he works with.
 

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From a scrictly shooting perspective, I like no VFG better. As a LEO, we do a lot more clearing/searching than we do shooting. Factor in varying thicknesses of body armor and clothing and the bulkier I get, the more I like the VFG.

I don't like lights with pressure/tape switches so light manipulation comes into the equation as well. With no VFG and the light mounted on the left side, above the rail, it was very very awkward to activate the light when shooting from the left shoulder. With the VFG and the light mounted on the right side, below the rail, the light could be easily activated from the left shoulder.

The two night fires made me reconsider the CAA FGA for a couple of reasons. First, it made the rifle more ambidextrous. Using the FGA, the light manipulation is the same for either shoulder. Second, light placement, especially with a 250 lumen light, became more critical. The barricades we were using were unpainted plywood. With the light in a Larue offset mount on the right side, I had to get further away from cover on the left side to make sure I didn't blind myself with my own light. Even with the dull, non reflective surface, it was suprising how easy it was to get a lot of light back in your face. With the FGA, the light is directly beneath the bore, so using cover is the same for the L or R side of the barricade. Even with the potential of a lot of splash back of light, I wouldn't go back to a lower intensity light. The ability to see more, at a greater distance is very important to me and worth the slight downside.

In the end, I would say it comes down to what best fits your needs based upon anticapted use and personal preference. If I didn't think I would use a lot of off hand shooting, I would probably run no VFG with the light on the left side above the rail. For the environment I work in, half the corners are left handed, so the more ambidextrous the rifle/light, the better, hence the reason the VFG is back on the gun.
Thanks for the insightful answer. Lot of good practical information. Just what I was looking for. 8)
 

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Very nice. If you dont mind I'd like to use your pics on another forum where someone was asking about fixed CTR stocks on XCR's, and how that configuration and LOP works while training

And dont forget to add pics here http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=6&f=2&t=213892&page=17

The ARFCOM XCR trolls start frothing whenever new XCR pics pop up. It's very amusing
 

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Martens....I don't see the cheek riser you had on the rifle in your pics in the stock section of the site.

Did you get rid of it? If so, why? I ordered my UBR today and am planning to get a CTR cheek riser to make sure I get a good cheek weld with AR sights and a red dot or 4x scope/acog.

Thanks,
Sean
 

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So how did your XCR compare to the AR's in regards to reliability?

Did any of the AR's go down?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I still have it, but don't use it unless I am running my 2-12 scope. It was too tight of a cheek weld with entry armor on and it interfered with the gas mask. Without the riser, the extra height allowed me to keep the same cheek weld with and without mask.

If you are running taller mounts than I am or have different needs, the riser may work better for you. Like I said, I snap it on when switching optics.

The XCR was the only one that actually broke a part (firing pin) but it still worked, although I had to down load mags to 28. I switched bolts because I had a spare.

One of the classmates was cussing his rifle after long sessions of shooting stating that it doesn't work as well dirty or dry. Being an instructor class with squared away classmates, all of the guns were well cared for and they new how to maintain them.

I did notice that it seemed like I cleared double feeds faster when they made us set them up. It seems like there is more room in the breach area of the XCR than the AR and rounds didn't jam in as tight. I have noticed that clearing a double feed on the XCR, locking the bolt back and dropping the mag, frees up the rounds and they trail the mag out the bottom. On an AR they seem to need help of some sort to free up.

I did notice that doing reloads in the method they taught, the XCR had less movements and could all be done from the master grip.

As much as I love the XCR, I can't say that it was vastly superior to the AR's in class. It had some minor differences that I like and prefer hence the reason I carry it.
 

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thanks for the pics.

I'd also agree the xcr is far easier and quicker in a response to a double feed than an ar platform. In regards to the firing pin, I've also broken two. Although its a cheap and easily replaceable part, I'd like to see robarm square that away.

your light experiences are also interesting. your lighting needs are different than my own since in your position you actually seek out baddies. in an hd role, I think the 80 lumens from my g2 led are pretty much ideal. As far as placement of the light, being a righty-I think high on the left side is best. I use a high thumb grip with my support hand so operating the light is easy, and when shooting from my support side, rolling my right hand over the top isn't difficult to do either.



 
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