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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,

I'm currently working on collecting sources in preparation for writing my thesis regarding the current Mexican drug "war." This is for my irregular warfare class. I am looking at using history to determine the origins of the various cartels, analysis of the structure and stability of the current and previous Mexican administrations, flow of weapons into Mexico, flow of drugs out of Mexico, size, structure, and area of operations of the various cartels, and conclude with possible solutions. Also any angles I am missing that I should consider? Particularly for y'all closer to our friends on the border, any insight or sources would be welcomed. Personal narrative is just as welcome as scholarly sources. Maybe working on this will keep my mind off the fact that I'm standing by to stand by for my XCR. Thanks all.

Taylor "Stand by... All the cool people are doing it." Pruitt
 

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Well to start off check out the the countries you want to research websites. They may have sections on there own drug wars and what they are doing about it. Also head to the DEA, CIA for country information and DHS (Dept Homeland Security) all should have something on the war on Drugs. Also go back and look at past Presidents that implemented the War on Drugs and see what intel they had and what there reason was for getting involved. DON"T USE WIKIPEDIA!!! It is not a site that you want to use as a source since it can be change whenever someone doesn't like what was writen about them. Wal-mart is a good example of this... Hope this helps.
 

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If you want to get into the fun stuff, get into the history of the zetas.

Essentially you have a mexican federales drug interdiction task force that was trained at Ft. Benning, Georgia.

They were good at what they did. So good that the mexican drug lords made them 'offers they couldn't refuse'.

Now they use those same tactics in military-style incursions into these united States, running dope into our country.
Check out what happened in Rio Grande City, Texas a while back. The zetas actually ran the National Guard troops out of their OP.
 

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I am looking at using history to determine the origins of the various cartels, analysis of the structure and stability of the current and previous Mexican administrations, flow of weapons into Mexico, flow of drugs out of Mexico, size, structure, and area of operations of the various cartels, and conclude with possible solutions.


If drugs were deregulated none of this would be a problem.
 

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I am looking at using history to determine the origins of the various cartels, analysis of the structure and stability of the current and previous Mexican administrations, flow of weapons into Mexico, flow of drugs out of Mexico, size, structure, and area of operations of the various cartels, and conclude with possible solutions.


If drugs were deregulated none of this would be a problem.


there's your answer folks.

perhaps you could draw some comparisons to prohibition era america in the paper.
 

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You pegged it 100% Lex!

The last time the Coors delivery guy got into a shoot-out with the Seagrams delivery guy was during prohibition.

Get rid of prohibition (address dope in the same way booze was addressed) and the problem goes away.

Besides, I see nothing in Article I section 8 that says congress has any authority to regulate drugs........ Interstate commerce is as close as they can come, so domestic (all in one state) production and sales is legal, eh? I think not.

It's a States Rights thing, or best left to society in general. I have nothing at all against employers doing random drug tests (assuming they're truly random) - THAT is legal and Constitutional. A "war on amirikan residents with drugs" is as Constitutional as....... most everything else that comes out of Sodom On The Potomac.
 

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Taylor,
You've got a fascinating subject. I teach high school government and would love to have a copy of your thesis to discuss in class, if that's all right with you. If you want to keep it private, though, that's fine, too.
 

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I agree completely with Lex.

It really is that simple, people just refuse to see it.



TaylorMP:

If you really needed something related more to crime/warfare, give a comparison chart of recorded criminal events from Prohibition and the current war on drugs.

Show just how quickly crime rates increased during prohibition and parallel that to the war on drugs.

That way you're using your history to analyze your recent history.
 

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You might also consider addressing the reasons why government has no real reason to really solve the problem. Doing so would eliminate the need for government to expand its power an influence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All,

Thank you for the replies and ideas so far! Master of Scholastics... I don't mind sharing once I develop it. Also, remember the primary focus is on the Mexican side of the house although I agree that policies in the US play a huge role in this situation.

Taylor
 

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I with most of you, legalize all of it and the problem goes away. Let all the stupid people kill themsleves.

Good luck on the paper.
 

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The goverment will never legalize anything they would have trouble collecting taxes on!

Col Maddog :2rifle:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I finally have a draft of my thesis! I still have a lot of work to do before it is done though. Sometimes I wish this was the matrix where they could just press a button and you know everything about a subject. So much reading...
 

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If you haven't done so already a useful tack on this would be the economics of drug use, prohibition and legislation.

There is substantial body of scholarly work on this going back to the Opium Wars period in China.

A useful primer

http://mises.org/story/2270

One of the good parts with this type of work is it tends to be very heavy on hard numbers, statistical analyses, charts and graphs, all "good" from a thesis perspective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here is a rough draft of my thesis. I have not concluded how I believe a solution can be reached yet, so really my thesis can be looked at as more of a guide to my paper rather than a statement to be proven at the moment (so not really a true thesis yet). For solutions I am currently looking at global deregulation, broad military action and political shake-ups by the Mexican government, direct military intervention by a foreign power, UN/NATO deployments, increased FID operations conducted by the US, etc. I'm also looking into any historical examples there might be of governments that have managed to escape the downward spiral of corruption. I mention that the response must be unified and global because of Mexico's position as a developed nation. Mexico will set a precedent in regards to whether or not a developed nation can succeed in recovering from narcotics induced corruption(this may or may not prove true... I haven't gotten far enough in my research to know). In addition, the trafficking networks that support the Mexican cartels span the globe, thus making it necessary for a unified global response. As always, I welcome comments. Master of Scholastics - Hopefully I'll have a revised version of my thesis ready within the next 2 weeks.

"Solving the problem of the Mexican drug cartels will require a unified global response. In order to determine what that response should be, several analyses must be conducted: historical analysis of the origins and traditional impact of Mexican drug cartels, analysis of the past and current flow of drugs, money, weapons, and people, analysis of past and current corruption cases, analysis of past and current operations against the cartels, analysis of the current state of the Mexican infrastructure, and an analysis of the underlying economic problems that have allowed the cartels to flourish."
 

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Don't know if you can get hold of a copy but this might be a useful tie together on the cultural elements and how the "outlaw" became culturally less bandido and more "Robin Hood"esque without the underlying ethos of support for the downtrodden.

http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/the_americas/v064/64.2wasserman.html

Bandit Nation: A History of Outlaws and Cultural Struggle in Mexico, 1810-1920

To quote the blurb

Product Description

Stories about postcolonial bandits in Mexico have circulated since the moment Mexico won its independence. Narratives have appeared or been discussed in a wide variety of forms: novels, memoirs, travel accounts, newspaper articles, the graphic arts, social science literature, movies, ballads, and historical monographs. During the decades between independence and the Mexican Revolution, bandit narratives were integral to the broader national and class struggles between Mexicans and foreigners concerning the definition and creation of the Mexican nation-state.

Bandit Nation is the first complete analysis of the cultural impact that banditry had on Mexico from the time of its independence to the Mexican Revolution. Chris Frazer focuses on the nature and role of foreign travel accounts, novels, and popular ballads, known as corridos, to analyze how and why Mexicans and Anglo-Saxon travelers created and used images of banditry to influence state formation, hegemony, and national identity. Narratives about banditry are linked to a social and political debate about “mexican-ness” and the nature of justice. Although considered a relic of the past, the Mexican bandit continues to cast a long shadow over the present, in the form of narco-traffickers, taxicab hijackers, and Zapatista guerrillas. Bandit Nation is an important contribution to the cultural and the general histories of postcolonial Mexico.
 
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