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I was just watching a program on the National Geographic Channel about some Navy Seals and Army Rangers at Takur Gar (The battle at Roberts ridge). Wow. What struck me was how how many misconceptions we sometimes have about the typical soldier. We tend the think of them as somewhat robot-like, overconfident, overmachismoed men who have had their fear and emotions trained out of them. What you see in these types of stories where they interview the surviving soldiers afterward is that these are just ordinary men with all the human frailties and fears who somehow manage to overcome all of that to do things that are just beyond extrordinary. Bravery doesn't even begin to decribe it. How fortunate we are to have men like this.
 

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Roberts Ridge was a bad one. I recommend you read the book "Not a Good Day to Die", which starts out if I remember correctly, right as the 1st Chinook is on short final to the ridgeline landing.. I started it then it got "loaned" to someone. I need to buy it.

You are right, the military is filled with average people that rise to the occasion when it is needed. Nobody sets out to become a war hero and nobody wakes up in the morning determined to die for their country. For some guys, that is just the reality of each and every mission. They live with that possibility and cope with it as best they can.
 

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is that these are just ordinary men with all the human frailties and fears who somehow manage to overcome all of that to do things that are just beyond extraordinary.
That's what defines true courage.
Uncommon valor was a common virtue.
SEMPER FI
 

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SrA Jason Cunningham was a PJ at the base I was stationed at in south GA. Received the AF Cross, posthumously, for his actions there. Everyone on post turned out when they brought him home, as did every specops guy for a hundred miles. It was rumored the other AF casualty was up for the MoH but presenting would mean an admittance of leaving him behind. I don't know what ever came of it.

As far as the impression of never being scared, well, I can tell you about the first time we made contact back in '03. It may be a funny story now, but it sure put things into perspective for me and my guys.
 
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