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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know that a lot of use have taken different carbine classes, so I thought that something we could do is post some of the drills that we have brought home with use and started using during our normal range sessions. That away someone who has not been able to attend a class will have an idea of what type of skills are more important to practice then others, and also for people like me who have taken a class or two but is not sure of what is the best way to practice the skills that we learned so that while we still remember how to do them correctly we can still practice.

So I guess what I am looking for is what Training Drills does everyone do when they go to the range ? whether it a be a 360 degree range or not.

Also any videos or pictures of you or someone else doing the drills properly would help myself and others
 

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tacweapon,
What kind of classes are you talking about? This will be my first semi-auto rifle and I would really like to learn to use it well for any situation.
I don't think there is course around here for shooting these with obstacles. I might have to make my own course at my dad's farm. Do you have pics of some you have shot at?
Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was really referring to Carbine classes but really any courses could be but here from handgun to long range rifle.

The course I took was Pat Goodale's Tactical Rifle. If you look in the General Discussion Section for I have been accepted to attend a 3 day tactical rifle course you will see a over view of what I did in class with a few pictures.
 

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Try Thunder Ranch. You can buy their training videos and practise before you go.
 

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I don't have any pictures of videos-my first question is what level are you starting at?

Common skills that we routinely hone before heading downrange are pretty easy to work at most ranges. Simple perishable skills are extremely easy to work-mix in a few spent rounds with your load and forget where they're at. When you're engaging targets and you have a failure to fire you clear and re-engage. Not sure if simulating a stove pipe is realistic with the XCR but that's another situation that we rehearse as it's not overly uncommon on the M4/M16A4.

Hot/cold reloads are the next issue we rehearse. Fill your mags with random levels of ammo and mix them up. As you're firing and you run dry, stay on target and as you're releasing your mag with your shooting hand your other hand is switching out the next mag. If you're in a safe position, of course you'd try to switch out the magazines without dropping one (firefight you don't want to lose it-range, it's expensive to replace). One way or another, you always want to retain your mags. If you drop the empty-find it with your foot and kneel to pick it up while staying on target. Muscle memory is key for reloads, knowing which mag is full and which is empty is key. They always need to go the same direction and same location on your body. The lesson learned in Iraq is that your dump pouch isn't just great for carrying your gatorade but does a good job at keeping your mags close.

Hot reloads are perfect for a condition one weapon when you've got a pause in action. Pull out your full mag and while using the non-shooting hand, remove the inserted mag with that hand and slide the other mag back in. Sounds easy-but if you're staying on target and watching downrange, it takes some practice to get the hang of it. This is also a drill that benefits from having someone to tell you when the target is up (we don't have the money for pop ups, this simulates a target arrising in the middle of a change).

From there you can move into failure drills, drills with the previously mentioned mixed loads or short loads, weapons transition if you're carrying a side arm as well, etc. Having a target downrange and up when your weapon jams isn't a good spot and if you are carrying a sidearm and don't know how your rifle falls when you transition-that's a bad spot to be in.

Hopefully this helps and isn't too basic. It's served me and my friends well in our time, there are more skills but those are the ones that come to mind when it comes to getting into a shooting course. If you and your friends can get your hands on an old beater car to engage, a lot of people don't realize the way your round is affected when it hits a windshield, the best way to take out a tire, etc. It's good to play with and can be a real life saver God forbid you ever need to engage a moving vehicle.
 

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The Magpul DVD is also a good place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies, I know most of the basic skills for carbine, I was just looking for some drills to use instead of repeating the same drills I have been doing.

When I went to the Carbine class part of the class was shooting an old car to see how it affects your bullet, I never would have thought there would be such a difference before I did it.

I had been thinking about getting the Magpul DVD, I just would need to get a portable DVD player to take to the range with me. I would love to take their class and it is going to be fairly close to home this spring but unfortunately I probably wont have the money.
 

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Thanks for the replies, I know most of the basic skills for carbine, I was just looking for some drills to use instead of repeating the same drills I have been doing.

When I went to the Carbine class part of the class was shooting an old car to see how it affects your bullet, I never would have thought there would be such a difference before I did it.

I had been thinking about getting the Magpul DVD, I just would need to get a portable DVD player to take to the range with me. I would love to take their class and it is going to be fairly close to home this spring but unfortunately I probably wont have the money.
Let me know how that works out, I want to improve on my skills so I'm not sitting in one place for too long...
 

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One piece of literature that you may enjoy is:

http://www.vikingtactics.com/book.html

It may seem basic, but it's packed with information that everyone can use. It's a great reference. Not filled with tons of drills, but it will definitely give you a lot to work on and think about.
 

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I had been thinking about getting the Magpul DVD, I just would need to get a portable DVD player to take to the range with me.
lol, you can do all manner of manipulation and malfunction drills in the comfort of your family room as long as you have snap caps or expended cases handy... no need for a dvd player at the range! :p

writing down a list of their drills and taking it with you to the range to practice would also suffice.

I've been wanting to get some more training dvd's, what all is out there? I'd imagine there is good stuff from thunder ranch and probably gabe suarez, who else has worthwhile stuff?
 

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I think the Marines are hiring.
 

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Do the basics over and over until you are quick and can do them blind folded and withut having to think through them. then move up to new skills.

If something happens and you have to think about the drill you're not good enough. Practise until it is instinctive.
 

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If you're going to throw some spent casings in your mag, better bring some cleaning rods. That's a good way to get a casing lodged in your chamber. I may hear some arguments about that, but I've seen it, and had to clear it. Besides, why risk damaging your chamber? Save yourself some heartache, do the same drill suggested above but buy some dummy rounds or snap caps.

As suggested above if you can afford it, go to a school. You can buy all the ammo in the world (and that's great if you're just shooting to have a good time.) but if you're training wrong, it doesn't matter how many shots you've fired inefficiently/ineffectively. If you want to be proficient, you'll have to seek professional training.

Everything will tie in, body positioning, (am I wearing plates?) head positioning, location of your gear/mags, where is my cover? What do I do if my gun fails? Am I close enough that I have to transition or do I have cover/supporting fire to fix the problem? Where's my E&E route?

Some things I can't stress enough:
-Knowing where your gear is. Can you effectively reload without dropping your head to look for your mags? Can you put a half loaded mag away (after tac-reload) without having to look? Most importantly can you draw and re-holster your pistol without looking?

-Dry firing. MAKE SURE THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO AMMO IN THE SAME ROOM!!! Grab some snap caps, load up some mags, simulate your gun has just gone dry and reload. Practice both the bolt locked back, and not locked back. (It happens). Reload with a magazine w/ snapcaps, acquire your target and press. The more you practice, the better you'll see your range sessions going.

Most important of all, muzzle up or muzzle down, DO NOT FLAG YOUR BUDDIES!!! Know their location in relation to your muzzle. Nobody likes the guy who consistently points his gun at you regardless of your finger position or condition of weapon. Unless you are going Sim, or it's understood with everyone there is absolutely no ammo, mags in wells, chamber locked back (flagged if possible!).

Again, it's worth the money to seek professional training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have already gone to a 3 day class, so I know the basics the problem is that the instructors did not really give us any drills to practice after we left, so I have been doing the same things we did in class on my own. I was just looking for suggestions on how to practice the basics using some different drills and scenarios.
 

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The one thing I would do over and over and practice reloading. Use both mag retention techniques and dump your mags.
 

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One of the most difficult things to do when choosing which school to go to is filter through the BS. There are too many guys out there offering expert training and all they've ever done is take a few classes of their own. Before I plunked down my hard earned cash, I would do loads of research.
 

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One of the most difficult things to do when choosing which school to go to is filter through the BS. There are too many guys out there offering expert training and all they've ever done is take a few classes of their own. Before I plunked down my hard earned cash, I would do loads of research.
Go here http://www.insightstraining.com/ or here http://www.thunderranchinc.com/director.html I have been to both multiple times over the years, they both have great instructors and are serious about their work -- no BS. Well worth the time and expense.
 

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Go get a Thunder Ranch video and watch it. They have a very good reputation and their courses are sought after. Then figure out the most important drills and go over them until you do them instinctively and withut having to think. what I used to teach and the orcer in which we trained was the following;

Immediate Action drills (Jame/Malfunction drills)
Reload
Shooting supported and unsupported
Off side shooting (either change hands or leaning over)
Barricade shooting (Over, under and around)
Snap shooting
The Double Tap
Transition from rifle to pistol
Shooting a stationary target while moving
Shooting a moving target while stationary
Shooting a moving target while moving

the first two drills don;t require ammo at all. You can jam a coin in the top of a magazine to stop the bolt hold open from functioning. It's al about speed and muscle memory. Do the drills ofer anc over. If you have a friend get them to randomly call out types of malfunction, and you react as quickly as you can.

Start slow and work up the speed. Practise doesn't make perfect. Practise makes permanent, you need to get the drill s right and then repeat, and repeat and repeat........

Another drill we used to do was turn off the gas system and have ten clay targets/small steel plates at 50 yards and ten more at 100. Give yourself 60 secconds to hit them all. With no gas you have to charge the weapon for each shot, it's a great way to learn to be more accurate with each shot. First time around don't be surprised if you only hit a few targets. As you get better you will surprise yourself how calm you can become despite the pressure.

With the double tap, start cloe to the target and gradually over the weeks you can work backwards and increase the distance. If your groups are too tight then shoot faster, too big shoot slower. You will have to decide what you consider acceptable spread.
 

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One of the most difficult things to do when choosing which school to go to is filter through the BS. There are too many guys out there offering expert training and all they've ever done is take a few classes of their own. Before I plunked down my hard earned cash, I would do loads of research.
This is 90% of the classes that have sprung up in recent years. In addition there are some VERY unusual to useless techniques being taught as instructors look for a niche to patent, package and sell.

At one point it was standard USGI MOUT principles. Now we have virtual break dancing with firearms because it makes for great highlight reels on youtube to sucker in new students

In addition be wary of any instructor that pushes you away from efficiency in movements. If an instructor is teaching you to do something with 10 movements when it should only be 4, walk away, regardless of the name behind the class.
 

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One of the most difficult things to do when choosing which school to go to is filter through the BS. There are too many guys out there offering expert training and all they've ever done is take a few classes of their own. Before I plunked down my hard earned cash, I would do loads of research.
This is 90% of the classes that have sprung up in recent years. In addition there are some VERY unusual to useless techniques being taught as instructors look for a niche to patent, package and sell.

At one point it was standard USGI MOUT principles. Now we have virtual break dancing with firearms because it makes for great highlight reels on youtube to sucker in new students

In addition be wary of any instructor that pushes you away from efficiency in movements. If an instructor is teaching you to do something with 10 movements when it should only be 4, walk away, regardless of the name behind the class.

I couldn't agree more!
 
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