XCR Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,177 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys,

You know I adore you all. But I talk to SO MANY people every day... via PM, phone, email, you name it. I get repairs in, and more often than I'd like there is no note, no return address except for one the beaten up original shipment label, no explanation...


PLEASE, if you send something in... include a note. I manage to be on a first name basis with most of you, but sometimes my memory is not on the same page and a friendly reminder of what you need me to do for you is always appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
FYI Terra, I'm going to Paris at the end of May, I'm sure there are one or two shoe boutiques along the Champs-Elyese and the Left Bank, what have you got in trade? ;D

Cruzzer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
FYI Terra, I'm going to Paris at the end of May, I'm sure there are one or two shoe boutiques along the Champs-Elyese and the Left Bank, what have you got in trade? ;D

Cruzzer
Oh-see if you can't find any unfired WWII rifles while you're over there, I hear they sell them for a fair rate...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,362 Posts
FYI Terra, I'm going to Paris at the end of May, I'm sure there are one or two shoe boutiques along the Champs-Elyese and the Left Bank, what have you got in trade? ;D

Cruzzer
Oh-see if you can't find any unfired WWII rifles while you're over there, I hear they sell them for a fair rate...

They were ALL unfired, right?! ::) :duh: ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,623 Posts
I wonder how many Thompsons,BAR's,M1 Garands,M1 carbines,and 1911's are off the shores of Omaha,that's to say nothing of all those brave men carrying them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,143 Posts
FYI Terra, I'm going to Paris at the end of May, I'm sure there are one or two shoe boutiques along the Champs-Elyese and the Left Bank, what have you got in trade? ;D

Cruzzer
Oh-see if you can't find any unfired WWII rifles while you're over there, I hear they sell them for a fair rate...
Unfired, only dropped once?



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,835 Posts
It also helps to wrap said piece of paper in a $20 bill.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,143 Posts
I wonder how many Thompsons,BAR's,M1 Garands,M1 carbines,and 1911's are off the shores of Omaha,that's to say nothing of all those brave men carrying them.
Salt water wouldn't leave much left of a lot of those.

I was diving off the West side of Oahu while visiting a friend there a few years ago and recovered what looks like a spent .30 caliber machine gun bullet. There were quite a few littering this particular area, and the bottom was relatively smooth, bare lava so they were easy to spot. I was pretty careful about picking it up because it looked just like those stupid cone snails and I didn't want them to have to ship my body back.

They were telling me about doing some deeper dives not long before that and finding a live torpedo at about 300'.



100% free webcam site! | Awesome chicks and it is absolutely free! | Watch free live sex cam - easy as 1-2-3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,071 Posts
If you go to northern France where they still appreciate Americans you can find ordnance from WWI and WWII in the hedgerows. The farmers plow it up and end up piling it up out of the way off to the side. When I was stationed in the UK we had to set up a cordon for awhile because a construction site on post dug up a Nazi bomb from the blitz. Their EOD folks are pure professionals, let me say.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
Little story...

After a beer or two ur Colonel here tells stories about cleaning up a WWII battlefield when he was still a young Captain. I guess they showed up to rehab this place so the vets could do a 50 year reunion. When the Marines showed up on shore they started meeting the farmers and kids. The first thing they found was that the kids would bring it live hand grandades to the teacher like they were apples-there was a box at the front of the room they'd put these things in and it was overflowing. After cleaning the schools of all the ammo, they moved on to the battlefield with weed wackers ('cause hey, what good is an old battlefield in bad shape?) and started finding piles of spent ammo and occasional boxes which were never fired. Hard to believe the stuff was just left behind...but I guess nobody was able to grab it on the way in or out?

As it went on, I guess they ended up cleaning the entire area and the Colonel himself found the wing off a fighter as well as a few rifles and a machine gun. He brought home part of it as a souvenier of being at that battlefield...

The part that got me is that the young Marines were there when the vets showed up. I wish I could remember the battlefield he had mentioned-it was one of the big ones, but he said any number of the men started crying and went right to their fighting holes (which were never filled in). Fifty years later our guys still remembered where they had stood when they fought. Still remembered where they lost their buddies. It's way off topic of where this post started, but to think of all that is still out there-and the remaining history that is still here in some of our old timers is just incredible in my mind!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,623 Posts
A brotherhood born in blood is not soon forgotten.Sometimes I think the dead are better of in some ways in that they are not tortured by the memory of those that never came home,and how so may old combat veterans that are plagued by feelings of guilt for surviving when so many others did not.That is a weight I would not wish on anyone.I believe that's why sometimes memory loss,or blockage is a way the mind protects itself from the trauma of painfull,and incomprehensible events.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
0000033659 said:
http://www.michaelyon-online.com/


Red Flag

A missive arrived to me from a well-placed British officer. I know this officer well, and respect his abilities. He has been to both Iraq and Afghanistan. In part, the missive said:

“Please have a look at the attached from the UK Times. Regarding the Rachel Sylvester piece, we have not been able to find any such document/memo although it is possible that an e-mail exists somewhere that refers to such a matter – more likely to be a warning not to dick about regarding what extra troops the UK might be able to find for AFG and raise unrealistic US expectations.”

Rachel Sylvester US doubts about UK military effectiveness 6 Jan 09.pdf

The Special Relationship Times leader 7 Jan 09.pdf
The words imply that the US-UK relationship is fraying. This is untrue as seen from the foxholes I am constantly in. I have embedded with numerous British units in Iraq and Afghanistan, and have seen combat with all of those units. Maybe five or so. The units included 2 Rifles, 4 Rifles, Queen's Royal Lancers, Duke of Lancaster's, 2 Para, and I believe perhaps a couple more though there was much going on and it’s difficult to remember.

What I can say, is that the significant combat I saw with British soldiers made me respect them more with each battle. Yes, it’s true their gear needs serious upgrading. The British government needs to spend billions to upgrade the hardware. But when it comes to the soldier, British soldiers are extremely well-trained, courageous and ready for a big firefight at the drop of a hat. Our brothers and sisters are vastly outnumbered at Helmand Province in Afghanistan. I think about them several times a day and am concerned that they might take serious losses this year.

When the question comes up about what Americans think about our closest ally, I ask MANY American soldiers what they think of the British. There are mixed opinions of course, but the bottom line is that American combat veterans greatly respect British soldiers. The British just need better gear. Another well-placed British Army officer recently told me while I was in Afghanistan that the British have plenty of helicopters. I did not respect those words, though I was told by an important American officer that this British officer is very good. “Don’t bullshit me, sir,” I replied only in my head. “I Don’t like BS.” The British need more helicopters. The American and British soldiers know this. A problem with the British soldiers is similar to a problem with our own Marines. They refuse to complain, so they get leftovers. A retired Australian officer of great significance asked me what I thought of British soldiers. I said something to the effect of, “My opinion is suspect because I greatly respect British soldiers…” If I did not respect British soldiers, I would not keep going into combat with them.

I have common access to the basement and stratosphere of our military. Nobody wants to see the British go. Strangely, both the British and American officers give high praise to the French. The French actually will fight like mad dogs, they say.

It’s always easy to find a British or American soldier who will make a passing derogatory remark about someone. If a reporter is shopping for a fight, those are easy to generate. Yes, it’s easy to find Brits who say bad things about Americans, but definitely harder to find Americans who will say something bad about Brits. We have some kind of strange reflex that prevents us from talking bad about Brits. Our soldiers respect the Brits and do not talk bad about them. But it’s easy to find British soldiers who complain about other British units, and Americans who complain about other American units. U.S. Marines complain about U.S. Army; Army complains about Marines. This battalion complains about that battalion. Soldiers complain. My ears overflow with vacuous complaints and also with real ones. There is no real complaint against the British other than they need to field their military with better gear. The British fight very well, but they need better gear.

This message was sent to me from a British officer:

"I know that, in the past, us Brits have rather banged on about our COIN experience and there is a natural (and not necessarily unhelpful) rivalry between US and UK forces that has existed for 70 odd years. But there is deep respect for the US military in the British Army, but particularly the US Army and USMC with which we have more contact, especially the doctrinal transformation over the past few years. This goes from the lowest level, for example the Scottish infantry soldiers working with the MEU in Garmsir in 2008, to the highest levels of our command.

Let me give you just one example. In July 2006 a Danish soldier working under UK command in Helmand was grievously wounded in a rather beleaguered (it was under repeated direct and indirect fire) outpost in Helmand – if I remember correctly it was Musa Qaleh. The compound was too small for a Chinook to land to get the casualty out and the UK's small helicopters could not fly in the day time because of the extreme heat and altitude. The soldier was dying and he couldn't wait. A battle-group level hasty air assault operation was planned to secure a landing zone nearby in Taleban dominated area and the intent was for the small garrison to fight its way out to get the casualty to that landing zone. There was no doubt, not only must we expect to take further casualties, we could lose a Chinook. Then, a US Blackhawk medical helicopter swept in and then out of the compound with the casualty who I know was still alive when he later made it home to Denmark. The whole attitude, despite the acute risk involved, was one of "no problem, anytime, just ask", as we say, "normal jogging". Yet, no one who knew of that single event would have had anything other than the greatest admiration for those involved and the organization to which they belonged."

Our relationship with Great Britain is more than merely healthy. It’s very strong. The British are very close family. We are in a serious fight in Afghanistan. This is a team, and some members play harder than others. The British are ready and willing to throw hard shots. The British know the price of fighting. And they know that the price for not fighting can be much higher.
Nay Sayers can shut the [email protected]#% up for they know not of what they speak.













I Do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,531 Posts
As an British ex-soldier. Thank you.

Equipment has always been poor for the British soldier. As is our limited ability to provide support. Often we would train for and fight, with minimal support and thus plan and execute accordingly. For us it was always about just getitng the job done with what we had. If there is an elevated enemy position and we had no support, then do it the old fashioned way. subdue and flank with men on the ground. But always, get the job done.

As regards the complaining. We did tend to complain about everything. The reason has always been simple, if the Ministry of Defense thinks we are happy with our lot they will reduce funding further, so we constantly bitch and complain. If you see forward British positions, no gyms, airconditioning etc... sometimes it's just a ruin with a tarp thrown over it. Different strokes, that's all. Mutual respect is there and always has been.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top